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Archive for the ‘Canadian’ Category

There are so many great picture books to read with kids for Black History Month, but this year try this true story:

viola

Viola Desmond was arrested in 1946 in Halifax for sitting on the main floor rather than the balcony in a theatre. Because she was a non-white patron, theatre employees insisted Desmond sit in the balcony. She refused and was taken away by the police. Viola Desmond’s face will now be printed on Canada’s ten dollar bill.  An essential library book.

 

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sisters

The Two Sisters, a tale from the Squamish Nation, that explains the existence of two iconic peaks on the north shore of Vancouver. If you live in the lower mainland, you probably know these peaks as The Lions. This beautifully illustrated book is loved by teachers and students. Never in the library and always in use, I hope to purchase another two copies. As one grade 4 student told me, “I can see them from my front window!”

An essential library book. Great for launching writing and art projects.

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Image result for gord downie secret path

Beautifully illustrated, large format graphic novel by The Tragically Hip’s Gord Downie, is the true story of Chanie Wenjack, a young Aboriginal boy who escapes Indian Residential School to return home, with tragic results.

See the animated film here.

For adults and older students, read Joseph Boyden’s Wenjack.

Image result for joseph boyden wenjack

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Another wonderful book by local author, Deborah Hodge, West Coast Wild is a gorgeous ABC book with lots of information about local wildlife and habitats. Read aloud and make connections, be inspired to research local animals and write a class ABC book, and learn more about the area we live in. An essential library book for all westcoast schools. Karen Reczuck‘s stunning, realistic watercolours are evocative and compelling.

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Canadian author and illustrator Marianne Dubuc is my latest favourite. I first fell in love with the illustrations in Le Lion et L’Oiseau. Simply stunning. I love her use of line for texture and non-rectangular panels.

I’ve been reading Animal Masquerade to many classes Kindergarten to Grade 3. After the Kindergartens found the book hysterical, I wasn’t sure the older students would appreciate it, but they did! Every page kids get to call out their guesses and when you flip the page? They laugh and even scream.

Marianne Dubuc has several other picture books, written in French and some translated to English. I’ll let you know how they go over with the kids.

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Sometimes I Feel Like a Fox is a beautifully illustrated little book. Each spread has a lovely portrait of a child as a particular animal and a couple simple lines about why they feel like that animal.

Perfect for a writing prompt, art lesson, or discussing Anishinaabe totem animals – animal guides.

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After working many years in British Columbia, Yang Hok is just about to board a ship back home to China, when his former lover appears, leaving their son in his care. Unwilling to bring home a half Chinese half Aboriginal child, Yang Hok searches for the boy’s mother. Will Yang find her before his ticket home expires?

Set in 1885, after the completion of the railway, A Superior Man depicts what life was like for early Chinese immigrants and migrant workers in British Columbia.

Well known for his gripping and often dark tales for kids, Paul Yee’s most recent novel is targeted at adults, and would be appropriate for older secondary school kids.

Also a fabulous storyteller, Paul Yee will be in town this fall doing several readings.

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