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Archive for the ‘tech’ Category

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Here’s my first project using conductive thread. Using the Sew Electric kit, I made a bookmark out of crafting felt, sewing a battery inside that lights up an led. Instructions for this project and others are available on the Sew Electric website. For this particular project, you don’t actually need the kit. You could just head to your nearest electronics store for a few bits. Lee’s Electronics in Vancouver is my favourite. The staff at Lee’s helped me order my Makey Makey kits and pull together enough very basic supplies to do a little project with coin batteries and mini LEDs. The staff were not only patient with my lack of understanding, but they were excited to hear teachers wanted to experiment with circuits in classrooms.

 

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The Sew Electric Kit has very fun projects, including ones where you use a Lilypad arduino board that you need to program, and comes with all the supplies you need for the circuitry.

 

 

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The Tech Club meets each Thursday at lunch in the library to play, learn, and explore technology in various forms. Annie Simard, grade 4/5 French Immersion teacher and previous Tech Mentor, and I have talked about Tech Club for awhile and finally launched it this year. Tech Club is a great way to engage keen and curious students with hands-on, experiential learning. The kids love to play and so do we!

But in a school so big and diverse, where did we start? We decided to invite teachers with students grade 4 and up to submit the names of two kids who would be interested in playing with technology one lunch hour a week. We mentioned that the club was a good opportunity for many learners, not just the ones who excelled at everything. So we called our first meeting and started off easy – with coding.

Many classes having just completed Hour of Code the week before, we keen to try their skills again using this fantastic site. Free, easy to use, and usable on iPads, Hour of Code offers video game style coding activities based on pop culture, such as Star Wars, Minecraft, and Frozen.


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From there we jumped to Scratch Jr., the lite app version of Scratch, a free drag-and-drop coding platform from MIT.

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And from there we started to play with Annie’s Ozobots, super fun little robots that ‘read’ colour combinations and perform various actions.
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Last week we pulled out the Makey Makeys and started experimenting. Makey Makeys are these great little circuit boards that you plug in the the USB port of a computer. Using alligator clips, you can then make all kinds of things into keyboard functions.

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Watch the video for inspiration:

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When I was asked to present a workshop to teacher librarians on iPad apps for higher order thinking, I recruited my friend and colleague Annie, who is very knowledgeable about tech. We decided to share about our top four apps and allow time for people to explore. There were other apps we either love or would like to explore, so we included logos of those on our hand out for people to check out on their own. The handout is designed to allow for note taking or reference rather than disseminating information.

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1W19WfZvdN4Pe-hEpq3NXfFQSNSfnz8ooL2sjYJc6XLI/pub

Check out the Vancouver Teacher Librarians’ Association professional event for 2015:

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Country Research checklist

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